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What is sub-ohm vaping and is it for you?

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The vaping community seems to have its fair share of difficult-to-understand terminology, and the term “sub-ohm vaping” is a perfect example. With the recent releases of such popular new products like the Aspire Atlantis and the Kanger Subtank, many newbies to vaping are beginning to wonder if their original decision to purchase a standard Kanger EMOW was a big mistake. What is this strange new thing called sub-ohm vaping, and why would anyone want to do it?

(Courtesy of EjuiceConnoisseur.com)



Sub-ohm vaping defined

As you can tell by the name itself, the basis of sub-ohm vaping deals with electricity. This is serious business, and we should never take anything involving electricity lightly. A standard vaping device, like the Kanger EMOW, has a range of between 1.5 to 3.0 ohms. In sub-ohm vaping, a different mechanism is used with a series of specially built coils and a measurable resistance of 1.0 ohm or less.

Now, if you remember learning about the age-old scientific principle of Ohm’s Law in high school science class, then you remember that a non-variable voltage (as in the battery of a Mechanical Mod) can successfully produce much more power when we decrease the resistance of the circuit (ohms). More power means bigger clouds and a higher intensity of flavor combinations. But for those of us who don’t remember Ohm’s Law…or high school, for that matter…we now have pre-made sub-ohm vaping technology.

The three main kinds of sub-ohm vaping

Before the onslaught of new vaping technology like the Aspire Atlantis and the Kanger Subtank, many vaping enthusiasts were modifying their tanks by-hand as a way to achieve the extra burst of power that sub-ohm vaping requires. As you might image, this can be extremely dangerous because we are talking about playing around with electrical circuits here. So manufacturers of vaping technology have come to our rescue, designing and producing pre-built devices that are infinitely safer and extremely affordable. Here are the three main kinds:

  • Rebuildable Dripping Atomizer or RDA: This method was widely popular before the days of the Kanger Subtank and Aspire Atlantis. An RDA is sometimes called a “dripper,” and they can be used with essentially any type of vaping device. Users place tiny drops of e-juice on the wick every few drags. This process can get quite tedious very quickly.
  • Rebuildable Tank Atomizer, RTA, or RBA: Not all RTA’s are for sub-ohm vaping but those that are include special airflow controls that cools the extra-hot vapor to keep the users’ lips from burning. An RTA essentially consists of a clearomizer with a special compartment for the user to include his custom built coils inside. No dripping required.
  • Sub-ohm tanks: The Kanger Subtank and the Aspire Atlantis are new-fangled sub-ohm tanks.They work very much like an RBA, but these new designs already contain disposable, pre-constructed coils. Users no longer have to build their own. It’s the no-muss, no-fuss approach to sub-ohm vaping.

There’s a lot more to sub-ohm vaping than meets the eye. Stay tuned. In Friday’s blog post, RastaVapors will discuss the pro’s and con’s of sub-ohm vaping. 

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